by Valery Bollier

(Huffington Post) During the last World Cup, three companies made predictions on the results of the final phase of fifteen matches. They were demonstrating the ability of their advanced technology to predict the outcome of football matches. Microsoft and Baidu correctly predicted all fifteen results while Google made only one mistake…

How were they able to make such accurate predictions? They crunched and analysed large numbers of historic results – what we call “big data” – and used that analysis to make their successful predictions.

It seems reasonable, therefore, to ask ourselves whether big data is changing the paradigm of the sports industry?

As is often the case, the answer can be found in the United States.

In Chicago, for example, if you want to talk about yesterday’s Steph Curry performance for the Golden State Warriors, people will talk about his performance stats, but in Europe it is very different.

In Europe, we still predominantly talk about sports with our heart, in an emotional way, much more than with our brain.

In Paris or Rome, fans will most probably tell you that sport is an art, not a science.

Europe has started to follow the stats and data movement, but America is clearly showing the rest of us the way.

 

Read the full article at Huffington Post